90 Best Quotes from It’s Kind Of a Funny Story | Ned Vizzini

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Here Are The Quotes From It’s Kind Of a Funny Story :

Quotes from It's Kind Of a Funny Story
Quotes from It’s Kind Of a Funny Story
It's Kind Of a Funny Story book
its kind of a funny story
  • “I didn’t want to wake up. I was having a much better time asleep. And that’s really sad. It was almost like a reverse nightmare, like when you wake up from a nightmare you’re so relieved. I woke up into a nightmare.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  • “I can’t eat and I can’t sleep. I’m not doing well in terms of being a functional human, you know?”
    — Ned Vizzini
  • “I waste at least an hour every day lying in bed. Then I waste time pacing. I waste time thinking. I waste time being quiet and not saying anything because I’m afraid I’ll stutter.”
  • “It’s so hard to talk when you want to kill yourself. That’s above and beyond everything else, and it’s not a mental complaint-it’s a physical thing, like it’s physically hard to open your mouth and make the words come out. They don’t come out smooth and in conjunction with your brain the way normal people’s words do; they come out in chunks as if from a crushed-ice dispenser; you stumble on them as they gather behind your lower lip. So you just keep quiet.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  • “People are screwed up in this world. I’d rather be with someone screwed up and open about it than somebody perfect and ready to explode.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  • “I don’t know how I can be so ambitious and so lazy at the same time.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  • “I’m done with those; regrets are an excuse for people who have failed.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  • “Things to do today: 1) Breathe in. 2) Breathe out.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  • “I’m fine. Well, I’m not fine – I’m here. Is there something wrong with that?
    Absolutely.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  • “Dreams are only dreams until you wake up and make them real.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  • “I don’t owe people anything, and I don’t have to talk to them any more than I feel I need to.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  • “Sometimes I just think depression’s one way of coping with the world. Like, some people get drunk, some people do drugs, and some people get depressed. Because there’s so much stuff out there that you have to do something to deal with it.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  • “I’m smart but not enough–just smart enough to have problems.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  • “I just want to not be me.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  • “Life’s not about feeling better, it’s about getting the job done.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  • “See, when you mess something up, you learn for the next time. It’s when people compliment you that you’re in trouble. That means they expect you to keep it up.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  • “Life can’t be cured, but it can be managed.”
    — Ned Vizzini
its kind of a funny story ned vizzini
  1. “I’m not better, you know. The weight hasn’t left my head. I feel how easily I could fall back into it, lie down and not eat, waste my time and curse wasting my time, look at my homework and freak out and go and chill at Aaron’s, look at Nia and be jealous again, take the subway home and hope that it has an accident, go and get my bike and head to the Brooklyn Bridge. All of that is still there. The only thing is, it’s not an option now. It’s just… a possibility, like it’s a possibility that I could turn to dust in the next instant and be disseminated throughout the universe as an omniscient consciousness. It’s not a very likely possibility.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  2. “That’s all I can do. I’ll keep at it and hope it gets better.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  3. “So why am I depressed? That’s the million-dollar question, baby, the Tootsie Roll question; not even the owl knows the answer to that one. I don’t know either. All I know is the chronology.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  4. “Some of the most profound truths about us are things that we stop saying in the middle.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  5. “Since I was a kid, which you refer to as ‘back when you were happy. Right.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  6. “What happened when you woke up? I was having a dream. I don’t know what it was, but when I woke up, I had this awful realization that I was awake. It hit me like a brick in the groin. Like a brick in the groin, I see. I didn’t want to wake up. I was having a much better time asleep. And that’s really sad. It was almost like a reverse nightmare, like when you wake up from a nightmare you’re so relieved. I woke up into a nightmare. And what is that nightmare, Craig? Life? Life is a nightmare. Yes.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  7. “I should be a success and I’m not and other people- younger people- are. Younger people than me are on TV and getting their lives in order. I’m still a nobody. When am I going to not be a nobody?”
    — Ned Vizzini
  8. “I wanted to tell people, “My depression is acting up today” as an excuse for not seeing them, but I never managed to pull it off.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  9. “No,” mom says, looking at me in the eyes. “What’s a triumph is that you woke up this morning and decided to LIVE. THAT’S a triumph. That’s what you did today.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  10. “Life is a nightmare.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  11. “The absolute worst part of being depressed is the food. A person’s relationship with food is one of their most important relationships. I don’t think your relationship with your parents is that important? Some people never know their parents. I don’t think your relationship with your friends are important. But your relationship with air-that’s key. You can’t break up with air. You’re kind of stuck together. Only slightly less crucial is water. And then food. You can’t be dropping food to hang with someone else. You need to strike up an agreement with it.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  12. “Depression starts slow.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  13. “My family shouldn’t have to put up with me. They’re good people, solid, happy. Sometimes when I’m with them I think I’m on television.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  14. “Noelle: But I look like a freak now. Craig: I told you, Noelle, everybody has problems. Some people just hide their crap better than others. But people aren’t going to look at you and run away. They’re going to look at you and think that they can talk to you, and that you’ll understand, and that you’re brave, and that you’re strong. And you are. You’re brave and strong.” P.366-367
  15. “I didn’t want to wake up. I was having a much better time asleep. And that’s really sad.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  16. “I found myself jealous of the people who wrote the books. They were dead and they were still taking up my time. Who did they think they were?”
    — Ned Vizzini
  17. “We’re all animals, high school is animals, but some of us are more animal than others. Like in ‘Animal Farm,’ which I read, all animals are created equal, but some are more equal than others? Here in the real world, all equals are created animal, but some are more animal than others.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  18. “My brain was all right back then; it didn’t get stuck in ruts.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  19. “You all right, man?’ This should be my name. I could be like a super hero: You All Right Man. Ah…’I stumble. Don’t bug Craig,’ Ronny is like. ‘He’s in the Craig zone. He’s Craig-ing out.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  20. “One thing I’ve learnt recently: how to think nothing. Here’s the trick: don’t have any interest in the world around you, don’t have any hope for the future, and be warm.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  21. “Everybody has problems. Some people just hide their crap better than others.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  22. “A person’s relationship with food is one of their most important relationships.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  23. “You shouldn’t be able to be alive and you are. You want to trade?”
    — Ned Vizzini
  24. “I wasn’t going to have enough money to pay for a Good Lifestyle, which meant I’d feel ashamed, which meant I’d get depressed, and that was the big one because I knew what that did to me: it made it so I wouldn’t get out of bed, which led to the ultimate thing—homelessness. If you can’t get out of bed for long enough, people come and take your bed away.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  25. “I had hurt her feelings, I found out later; I didn’t know I had that power.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  26. “It’s a huge thing, this Shift, just as big as I imagined. My brain doesn’t want to think anymore; all of a sudden it wants to do.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  27. “Dr. Barney stared at me, his lips puckered. What was he so serious about? Who hasn’t thought about killing themselves, as a kid? How can you grow up in this world and not think about it?”
    — Ned Vizzini
  28. “And that was the closest I’ve ever come to an epiphany.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  29. “They always said on TV you could do anything you wanted, but here I was trying to do something and it wasn’t working. I would never be able to do it.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  30. “Do you even know who the enemy is? I think… it’s me”.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  31. “I owe her everything and I love her and I tell her these days, although every time I say it, it gets a little diluted. I think you run out of I love yours.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  32. “I had fooled myself into thinking that I was something important to the rest of the world.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  33. “She’s pretty.” (It’s amazing how girls can say this and make it the most withering insult.)”
    — Ned Vizzini
  34. “I’ve had good moments scattered since then, times when I thought I was better, but that was the last day I felt triumphant.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  35. “That’s what gets me through the day. Knowing that I could do it. That I’m strong enough to do it and I can get it done.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  36. “It’s hard to talk when you want to kill yourself”
    — Ned Vizzini
  37. “A working brain is probably a lot like a map, where anybody can get from one place to another on the freeways. It’s the nonworking brains that get blocked, that have dead ends that are under construction like mine.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  38. “I’m waiting for her to say “Craig, what you need to do is X” and for the Shift to occur. I want there to be a Shift so bad. I want to feel my brain slide back into the slot it was meant to be in, rest there the way it did before the fall of last year, back when I was young, and witty, and my teachers said I had incredible promise, and I had incredible promise, and I spoke up in class because I was excited and smart about the world. I want the Shift so bad. I’m waiting for the phrase that will invoke it. It’ll be like a miracle within my life. But is Dr. Minerva a miracle worker? No. She’s a thin, tan lady from Greece with red lipstick.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  39. “I’m still a nobody, when am I not going to be a nobody?”
    — Ned Vizzini
  40. “Of course I wasn’t abused. If I were; things would be so simple. I’d have a reason to for being in a shrink’s office. I’d have a justification and something to work on. The world wasn’t going to give me something that tidy.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  41. “Is that the truth, Jimmy?” I ask without looking at him. “It’s the truth and it come to yah!” I smile.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  42. “Relationships change even more than people. It’s like two people changing. It’s exponentially more volatile. Especially two teenagers.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  43. “If you can’t get out of bed for long enough, people come and take your bed away”
    — Ned Vizzini
  44. As soon as I saw the Manhattan map, I wanted to draw it. I should be able to draw the place where I lived. So I asked Mom for tracing paper and she got it for me and I brought it into my fort and I pointed the light right down on the first map in the Hagstrom Atlas—downtown, where Wall Street was and the stock market worked. The streets were crazy down there; they didn’t have any kind of streets and avenues; they just had names and they looked like a game of Pick-Up Sticks.
    –Craig, pp. 22-23
  45. “In this early passage, Craig discusses one of his childhood attempts to create a map image. The younger Craig proves to have trouble drawing Manhattan, but this quotation captures his initial excitement about the possibility of creating an artwork of his own. As it’s Kind of a Funny Story progresses, Craig works backwards and re-captures this childlike, inspired attraction to art.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  46. “We kept doing it. It became a regular thing. We never formalized it, never named it . . . but on Fridays Aaron would call and ask me to watch movies. I think he was lonely. Whatever he was, he became the one person I wanted to stay in touch with after junior high. And now, a year later, I was in my kitchen holding my acceptance letter and wondering if he had one too.” Craig, pp. 59-60
  47. “Here, Craig describes his routine of going to Aaron’s house every Friday afternoon. This routine is such a part of his life that, even when he scores a major victory, his instinctive reaction is to seek out Aaron. Yet Craig detects a deeper meaning to his friendship; despite Aaron’s apparent confidence, Aaron may need Craig just as badly as the more timid Craig seems to need Aaron. Indeed, Craig is not the only character who is massively dependent on the Friday get-togethers.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  48. “What was I doing taking pills? I had just had a little problem and freaked out and needed some time to adjust. Anyone could have a problem starting a new school. I probably never needed to go to a doctor in the first place. What, because I threw up? I wasn’t throwing up anymore. Some days I wouldn’t eat, but back in Biblical times people did that all the time—fasting was a big part of religion, Mom told me. We were already so fat in America; did I need to be part of the problem?” Craig, p. 122
  49. “After spending some time following a regular treatment schedule, Craig becomes critical of his own practices. Here we see Craig’s desire for independence; he is aware that treatment for psychological issues can carry a social stigma with it, and refers to history and culture to convince himself that he should be stronger. Ironically, it is only by following a treatment regimen and acknowledging his problems that Craig will be able to make progress. The desire for independence turns out to be a sign of insecurity, not strength, in his case.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  50. “What the hell, I’m in the hospital. I put 4’s down the line—there are about twenty prompts—except for the lines about self-mutilation, drinking, and drug use (I am not putting anything about pot, that’s just the rule, told to me by Aaron—you don’t ever, ever admit to smoking pot, not to doctors, not to teachers, not to anyone in authority no matter how much you trust them; they can always report you to the FBI Pot-Smoking List). As I’m getting done, a squat black nurse with a kind wide smile and tightly braided hair steps in. She introduces herself in a thick West Indian accent.” Craig, p. 186

It’s Kind of a Funny Story Quote :

It's Kind Of a Funny Story quotes
  • “At this point in the novel, Craig is transitioning into the new world of Argenon Hospital, and is having trouble letting go of his identity in the world beyond. Craig’s first thought should, naturally, be for his own well-being. Yet he is still responding to the high-school world of social status represented by Aaron and, by doing so, may be hindering the process of clarity, honesty, and release that will address his depression issues.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  • “Something flashes out in the hall. The blond girl streaks to the window. I can’t be sure it’s her. I mean, it is her—it has breasts. And I think I recognize her small body and wife-beater. But I can’t see her face because she presses up a piece of paper against the glass: BEWARE OF PENIS.” Craig, p. 216
  • “The “blond girl” in this excerpt is Noelle, but Craig does not know her well enough to readily identify her by name at this early stage of his stay. Nonetheless, this scene—in which Noelle warns Craig that “Jennifer” is a transsexual—foreshadows Craig and Noelle’s later bond. In big ways (alerting Craig to his artistic powers) and small (sharing casual conversation), Noelle proves attuned to Craig’s situation and eager to help Craig navigate the world to the best of his ability.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  • “I feel the Cycling starting again—I’m going to get out of here at some point and have to go back into real life. This place isn’t real. This is a facsimile of life, for broken people. I can handle the facsimile, but I can’t handle the real thing. I’m going to have to go back to Executive Pre-Professional and deal with teachers and Aaron and Nia because what the hell else do I know? I staked everything on that stupid test. What else am I good at?” Craig, p. 259
  • “This quotation details a few of Craig’s more negative sentiments from his stay at Six North. Despite his panic, Craig clearly understands that his new milieu is a miniature version of the real world—except that, at this early stage in his stay, he draws the wrong conclusion. Rather than presenting a self-defeating and falsely soothing version of the real world, Six North presents the opposite: a place that prepares Craig to function better once he re-enters society at large.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  • “I look up at her, rolling her mouth and smiling down. I look at the map. It’s not a brain, clearly; it’s a map; can’t she see the rivers and highways and interchanges? But I see how it could look like a brain, if all the roads were twisted neurons, pulling your emotions from one place to another, bringing the city to life. A working brain is probably a lot like a map, where anybody can get from one place to another on the freeways. It’s the nonworking brains that get blocked, that have dead ends that are under construction like mine.” Craig, p. 292
  • “In this scene, Craig is beginning to re-discover his artistic powers. The art session and Noelle’s advice have awakened Craig to the idea of drawing maps, but Ebony (the “her” referenced above) helps Craig’s idea for the brain motif to form. Craig is breaking out of his solitude and learning to make sense of constructive advice from others. Art, which can be stereotyped as a lonely and idiosyncratic activity, in fact gives Craig a means to form important connections with the people around him.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  • “I’m glad you came here and got the help you needed,” Neil says, and he shakes my hand in that way that people do in here to remind themselves that you’re the patient and they’re the doctor/volunteer/employee. They like you, and they genuinely want you to do better, but when they shake your hand you feel that distance, that slight disconnect because they know that you’re still broken somewhere, that you might snap at any moment.” Craig, p. 339
  • “In interacting with Neil, who provides music therapy for the residents of Six North, Craig is reminded of his ambiguous status. Craig has begun to understand the importance of communication and artistic expression. He resembles Neil in these respects; however, the simple fact that Craig is confined to Six North while Neil is not places a considerable barrier between these two characters.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  • “What art school are you going to go to?” Dad asks. Manhattan Arts Academy? It’s easy to transfer to with my grades—oh, but Craig, that’s the school for kids who are all screwed up,” Dad says. I look at him. “Yeah? Dad?” I raise my wrist, show him the bracelets. I have pride in them now. They’re true, and people can’t screw with them. And when you say the truth you get stronger.” Craig, pp. 415-416
  • “This significant dialogue poses Craig against his own father. In a sharp shift from earlier passages, Craig now sees his position within Six North as a source of strength, not as a social stigma—even if his father thinks otherwise. Moreover, Craig had demonstrated a willingness to talk with adults, but not actually to challenge them, earlier in the novel. Here, he asserts himself against his father’s wishes in a way that he hadn’t before.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  • “I feel my brain on top of my spine and I feel it shift a little bit to the left. That’s it. It happens in my brain once the rest of my body has moved. I don’t know where my brain went. It got knocked off-kilter somewhere. It got caught up in some crap it couldn’t deal with. But now its back—connected to my spine and ready to take charge. Jeez, why was I trying to kill myself? It’s a huge thing, this Shift, just as big as I imagined. My brain doesn’t want to think anymore; all of a sudden it wants to do.” Craig, p. 443
  • “I didn’t want to wake up. I was having a much better time asleep. And that’s really sad. It was almost like a reverse nightmare, like you wake up from a nightmare you’re so relieved. I woke up into a nightmare.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  • “Life’s not about feeling better, it’s about getting the job done.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  • “I’m smart, but not enough – just smart enough to have problems.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  • “I’m done with those; regrets are an excuse for people who have failed.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  • “Life can’t be cured, it can be managed”
    — Ned Vizzini
  • “See, when you mess something up, you learn for the next time. It’s when people compliment you that you’re in trouble. That means they expect you to keep it up.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  • “Things to do today: Breathe in. Breathe out.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  • “People are so screwed up in this world. I’d rather be with someone screwed up and open about it than somebody perfect and ready to explode.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  • “I can’t eat and I can’t sleep. I’m not doing well in terms of being a functional human, you know.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  • “It’s tough to get out of bed; I know that myself. You can lie there for an hour and a half without thinking anything, just worrying about what the day holds and knowing that you won’t be able to deal with it.”
    — Ned Vizzini
  • “The stuff adults tell you not to do is the easiest.”
    — Ned Vizzini

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